Naturalistic

15 Ways to Develop Your Child’s Naturalistic Intelligence

Posted by on Mar 12, 2012 in Blog, Ideas in practice, Multiple Intelligences, Naturalistic | 0 comments

15 Ways to Develop Your Child’s Naturalistic Intelligence

So you want to improve your child’s Naturalistic Intelligence? Well, I have 15 fun, engaging and crazy effective ways for you to do that. But first, if you don’t already know: What is Naturalistic Intelligence? Naturalistic Intelligence is one of eight computational abilities that we all have and it pertains specifically to your ability to process information through your relationship with your natural surroundings.  Children who favor a Naturalistic Intelligence tend to have nurturing skills and prefer learning through direct exploration of nature. The does not mean they don’t use their other eight intelligences. Nor does it mean that only kids who like nature use their Naturalistic Intelligence. How do you develop Naturalistic Intelligence? Below are 15 ways to help your child develop their Naturalistic Intelligence. The activities are presented in levels of increasing complexity. These levels are in no way related to a child’s age or grade level. Rather, in light of the fact that each child has a unique intelligence profile, these activities allow children to start at whatever level they prefer and to continue feeling engaged and motivated as they advance to the more challenging levels. PS – many of these activities also help develop other intelligences (see the MI code references here). LEVEL 1 Take a walk and listen to the different sounds around you. Illustrate what you think the sounds look like as well as the source of the sound. [S.I.][M.I.] Collect a variety of leaves and classify them in five different ways. [LM.I.] Compare seeds and try to imagine the plants they will each become. Verify your information. [LM.I.] Draw a landscape complete with animals and plants. Think about the kinds of thinks that the animals and plants will need to survive and incorporate them into your drawing. [S.I.][Ia.I.] Go to a zoo and identify the different animals. How do they differ? How are they the same? How do these differences affect the animal’s relationships with its environment? Draw your favorite animals and tell someone about them. [LM.I.][S.I.][Ie.I.] LEVEL 2 Learn about different plants and their various uses and properties. How do certain plants help or harm us? [LM.I.] Plant a garden and learn how to care for it. Keep a journal and illustrations. [LM.I.][S.I.] Walk around your neighborhood and look at different plants and flowers. Think about why you have certain plants in your area? Do you notice any patterns? Conduct research about your plants and illustrate them in a journal. [LM.I.][S.I.] Draw a picture of your body. Draw a picture of an animal. How do the bodies differ? How are they the same? Why do you think the bodies share certain qualities and not others? Try this with other animals. [BK.I.][S.I.][Ia.I.] LEVEL 3 Learn about your body and how it functions. How does your body work in harmony to help you do the things you do? What can you do to keep your body healthy? [BK.I.][Ia.I.] Try different foods from different countries. How do they differ? How are they the same? What do these foods tell you about the countries from which they come? [BK.I.][Ia.I.][Ie.I.] Observe the night sky and try to find patterns or images composed of stars. Learn about the different constellations. [S.I.][LM.I.] Take a walk and notice the different patterns in nature. For instance, count the leaves in different plants, compare their shapes and sizes, look at branches and the stems that grow from them, look at petals and compare how many petals different flowers have. What other patterns to do you notice? [LM.I.] Read books and articles about nature and the environment. Write your own article about something you have discovered in nature or illustrate your discovery. [LM.I.][L.I.][S.I.] Learn...

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Multiple Intelligence Games

Posted by on Jun 7, 2011 in Ideas in practice, Linguistic, Mathematical, Multiple Intelligences, Naturalistic, Spatial | 0 comments

Yesterday I started a discussion multiple intelligences. My objective is to spend some time covering different techniques that we can employ as parents to help stimulate our children’s different intelligences. This brought to mind one of the first posts I wrote so I am bringing it back today as I think it is very relevant to this topic. The post is about certain games we play with our kids. What I like about these games is that not only do they provide countless hours of entertainment for relatively long periods of time but they also help develop children’s intelligence in different ways. The Animal Game The Animal Game is quite simple, it consists of thinking of an animal and then giving the other people clues to describe it. The person that guesses it right gets to go next. Our daughter’s favorite: “I am pink, I live in a farm and I go ‘oink oink.'” This isn’t rocket science but you’d be surprised how long the kids wi’ll play this game. The Animal Game can really be anything (including, the Anything Game). Some popular variations: the Food Game (a personal favorite delivered courtesy of the six-year old: “I am yellow, shaped like a square, and I live in a sandwich”) the Princess Game the Dinosaur Game the Holiday Game the Objects that Fly Game… you get the idea. This is a great exercise to help children develop their linguistic, visual, logical-mathematical and naturalist intelligences. Guess Who This is a game that involves guessing the person you are speaking about based on their relationship to other individuals. For instance: “Who is my father’s sister’s mother’s granddaughter’s granddaughter?” It can be as complicated or as simple as you need it to be (our three-year old loves this game). It is a great game to help develop linguistic, musical, and logical-mathematical intelligences. Math Games These generally involve raisins or mini chocolate chips, Legos, etc. T he purpose of these games is really to offer visuals to help explain mathematical concepts such as division, multiplication, addition, subtraction. We’ll have the kids count out a certain amount of raisins and then divide them into various piles, add or take away from the piles, etc. So, for example, with the three-year old I might have her count out ten raisins and divide them into 5 piles. When she thinks she’s finished, we’ll talk about whether the piles all look as if they have the same number of raisins, then we’ll count them to confirm. To the extent they are not the same, we’ll talk about what needs to happen for them to be even. Eventually she’ll get there and then we can talk about what division means. Or, we might just do addition: 1 raisin + 1 raisin = 2, 2+1, etc…. or subtraction, you have a pile of 5 raisins and you eat 1, how many are left? Then we verbalize 5-1 = 4. With the six-year old we do a bit more advanced work, for example, we use each raisin as a base 10 or do more complicated division/multiplication problems. This is a great game to help children develop their linguistic, logical-mathematical and visual intelligences. 20 Questions We come up with the end scenario, give them all the facts and have them ask us questions until they figure it out. This was one of my favorites: “the two opposing sides faced each other and the king gathered his knights for battle when suddenly a great big hand came down from above and picked up one of the knights, what happened?” (answer – this is...

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The Animal Game and other forms of entertainment

Posted by on Jan 13, 2011 in Blog, Ideas in practice, Interpersonal, Linguistic, Mathematical, Multiple Intelligences, Naturalistic, Spatial | 2 comments

Ever on the search for ways to entertain our kids (for that is, after all, our raison d’etre), we have amassed a small repertoire of games that I thought I’d share with you all. What I like about these games is that not only can they provide entertainment for relatively long periods of time but they also help develop children’s intelligence in different ways. To be clear, I am referring to intelligence as in multiple intelligences (a theory proposed by Howard Gardner and one that I wholeheartedly support). If you are not familiar with this notion, I highly recommend you read up on it. The first and family favorite is the Animal Game (which has any number of variations, as you’ll see below). I don’t recall how or when we started this but we have been playing the Animal Game forever. We’ll play it on the way to the store, on walks, on long drives, while making dinner, over dinner, in waiting rooms, etc. The Animal Game is quite simple, it consists of thinking of an animal and then giving the other people clues to describe it. The person that guesses it right gets to go next. Our daughter’s favorite: “I am pink, I live in a farm and I go ‘oink oink.'” This isn’t rocket science but you’d be surprised how long they’ll play this game. The Animal Game can really be anything (including, the Anything Game). Some popular variations: the Food Game (a personal favorite delivered courtesy of the six-year old: “I am yellow, shaped like a square, and I live in a sandwich”), the Princess Game, the Dinosaur Game, the Holiday Game, the Objects that Fly Game… you get the idea. This is a great exercise to help children develop their verbal, visual, logical-mathematical and naturalist intelligences. Guess Who is a game that involves guessing the person you are speaking about based on their relation to other individuals. For instance: “Who is my father’s sister’s mother’s granddaughter’s granddaughter?” This can be as complicated or as simple as you need it to be (our three-year old loves this game). It is a great game to help develop verbal and logical-mathematical intelligences. We are also fond of playing Math Games with our kids. They generally involve raisins or mini chocolate chips, etc. The purpose of these games is really to offer visuals to help explain mathematical concepts such as division, multiplication, addition, subtraction. We’ll have the kids count out a certain amount of raisins and then divide them into various piles, add or take away from the piles, etc. So, for example, with the three-year old I might have her count out ten raisins and divide them into 5 piles. When she thinks she’s finished, we’ll talk about whether the piles all look as if they have the same number of raisins, then we’ll count them to confirm. To the extent they are not the same, we’ll talk about what needs to happen for them to be even. Eventually she’ll get there and then we can talk about what division means. Or, we might just do addition: 1 raisin + 1 raisin = 2, 2+1, etc…. or subtraction, you have a pile of 5 raisins and you eat 1, how many are left? Then we verbalize 5-1 = 4. With the six-year old we do a bit more advanced work, for example, we use each raisin as a base 10 or do more complicated division/multiplication problems. This is a great game to help children learn math concepts by using their verbal and visual intelligences. On the topic of math games,...

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