Musical

20 Ways to Develop Your Child’s Musical Intelligence

Posted by on Aug 12, 2011 in Blog, Ideas in practice, Multiple Intelligences, Musical | 0 comments

20 Ways to Develop Your Child’s Musical Intelligence

So you want to improve your child’s Musical Intelligence? Well, I have 20 fun, engaging and crazy effective ways for you to do that. But first, if you don’t already know: What is Musical Intelligence? Musical Intelligence is one of eight computational abilities that we all have and it pertains specifically to your ability to process information through sound and auditory stimuli. Children who favor a Musical Intelligence will gravitate towards musical forms of interaction and communication. The does not mean they don’t use their other eight intelligences. Nor does it mean that only kids who are good at music use their Musical Intelligence. How do you develop Musical Intelligence? Below are 20 ways to help your child develop their Musical Intelligence. The activities are presented in levels of increasing complexity. These levels are in no way related to a child’s age or grade level. Rather, in light of the fact that each child has a unique intelligence profile, these activities allow children to start at whatever level they prefer and to continue feeling engaged and motivated as they advance to the more challenging levels. PS – many of these activities also help develop other intelligences (see the MI code references here). LEVEL 1 Create a song to teach a friend something they don’t know. Test them on their knowledge. Did the song work? Why or why not? [L.I.] [Ia.I.] [Ie.I] Create a song or a rhyme to help you remember something new. [L.I.] [Ia.I.] Listen to instrumental music and discuss its meaning with a friend. What emotions does the music convey to you? Are they the same emotions that your friend is experiencing? [Ia.I.] [Ie.I] Create a song about a story you have heard or read. [L.I.] [S.I.] Listen to different types of music. How do they make you feel? Why? Reflect upon which music helps you relax, which music helps you concentrate, which music wakes you up, etc. [Ia.I.] Try using music as a background to learn something new. How does the music affect your experience? Listen to patterns in music. [LM.I.] Listen to instrumental music and try to replicate the various sounds with your voice. [BK.I.] Have a friend make silly movements. Create the sound effects that go with those movements. [BK.I.] [Ie.I] LEVEL 2 Explore words that sound like what they mean (e.g. “boom”). Create new ones. [L.I.] Write a poem and read it out loud emphasizing certain sounds. Change the sounds you emphasize, how does that affect the poem? [L.I.] Listen to a song and change your facial expression whenever someone else sings or there is a different instrument. Use your body to pretend you are playing the various instruments you hear. [BK.I.] Listen to music from different cultures. How does the music differ? How is it similar? What does the music tell you about the time and place in which it was composed? [Ie.I.] Take a walk and listen to the different sounds. Illustrate what you think the sounds look like as well as the source of the sound. [N.I.] [S.I.] Listen to a piece of music and illustrate the story you think the music is conveying. [S.I.] Listen to different kinds of music. How do they make you feel? What does the musician do to convey those emotions? [Ia.I] [Ie.I] Have a friend play a rhyming game with you by trying to find as many words that rhyme with the first word. Create a story using these words. [L.I.] LEVEL 3 Read a story out loud and focus on intonation and fluency, discuss how this affects the story. [Ie.I] [L.I.] Invent a new musical instrument and illustrate it. [LM.I.] [S.I.] Assign different...

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How to Enhance Your Child’s Musical Intelligence

Posted by on Jun 8, 2011 in Ideas in practice, Multiple Intelligences, Musical | 4 comments

Today let’s talk a bit about musical intelligence. Musical intelligence is a cognitive ability that relies on processing information in a musical or auditory way. This has less to do with our actual ability to play music and more to do with how we understand information around us. Musical intelligence is inherent in all of us and to varying degrees. Our specific background, culture, genetic make-up, and social experiences may shape our particular intelligence profile (i.e. which intelligences we tend to favor) but we still employ each of our various intelligences to process all of the information around us. As parents, the key is to understand how and when to employ different intelligences in order to help our children learn. The interesting thing here is that the experience of learning music is not just about musical intelligence. It engages your body (bodily intelligence), your ability to understand structure and mathematical complexity (logical-mathematical intelligence), your ability to convey an emotion through music and impact others through your creation (interpersonal intelligence), and your ability to internalize the music you are performing, to feel it and respond to it with your instrument (intrapersonal intelligence). What this means for me is that “learning music” is also about being mindful of how each of these intelligences are being engaged in that singular pursuit. If one focuses solely on the musical intelligence, it will not only be significantly more challenging for someone to learn to play music but, arguably, less rewarding as well. With that in mind, these are some of the things you can do to help enhance your child’s musical learning experience: to engage the musical intelligence: we listen to the songs he is working on and focus on identifying the notes he hears; he tries to replicate songs he likes (i.e. the Harry Potter or Star Wars theme songs) on his violin; and we work on having him listen to the sounds he is creating, trying to identify when he’s succeeded in hitting the right notes or spot areas of improvement. to engage the bodily intelligence: we work on his form. We talk about how the body and violin connect and work together, we talk about the design of the instrument and how the body molds to fit it, we listen to the sounds that the violin makes when he doesn’t have proper form vs. when he does, and we work on building the muscles he needs to support this form. to engage the mathematical intelligence: we talk about the structure of music, how music is built. For instance, we discuss quarter notes, half notes, rests, beats, measures, etc. and listen to the different sounds they make. We talk about how music is like a puzzle and each note is a different piece. As with any puzzle, every piece has its proper place and if a note is in the wrong place or shaped the wrong way, it won’t fit in the puzzle. We talk about complexity, how we start by creating simple pieces and then add layers to create more complex and interesting pieces, and we listen to different “complex” pieces to understand the concept. to engage the interpersonal intelligence: we listen to music and discuss how it makes us feel; we talk about how music is used in shows and movies and the effect it has on us as listeners; we try to identify how he can create that effect on others; we listen to notes that sound “sad” or “happy” and talk about why they evoke those emotions and how to use them in a musical piece. to engage the intrapersonal...

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