Bodily

18 Ways to Develop Your Child’s Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence

Posted by on Oct 24, 2011 in Blog, Bodily, Ideas in practice, Multiple Intelligences | 1 comment

18 Ways to Develop Your Child’s Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence

So you want to improve your child’s Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence? Well, I have 18 fun, engaging and crazy effective ways for you to do that. But first, if you don’t already know: What is Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence? Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence is one of eight computational abilities that we all have and it pertains specifically to your ability to process information using your body and the way you connect with the world in a physical manner. Children who favor a Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence will tend to be quite skilled at controlling their bodies; they will learn through physical contact with their surroundings moreso than through mental exercises and they will interact with others in physical ways.. The does not mean they don’t use their other eight intelligences. Nor does it mean that only kids who are athletic or physically-skilled use their Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence. How do you develop Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence? Below are 18 ways to help your child develop their Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence. The activities are presented in levels of increasing complexity. These levels are in no way related to a child’s age or grade level. Rather, in light of the fact that each child has a unique intelligence profile, these activities allow children to start at whatever level they prefer and to continue feeling engaged and motivated as they advance to the more challenging levels. PS – many of these activities also help develop other intelligences (see the MI code references here). LEVEL 1 Make letter shapes with your body. [L.I.] Listen to instrumental music and try to make the various sounds with your voice. [M.I.] Have a friend make silly movements. Create the sound effects that go with those movements. [M.I.] Listen to a song and change your facial expression whenever someone else sings or there is a different instrument. [M.I.] Listen to a song and make movements with your body that match the actions in the song. [M.I.] Tell a story using only your body and no words or images. Use your body to convey different emotions. What parts of your body change and how? [Ia.I.] LEVEL 2 Assign different sounds or musical notes to your body parts and compose a song using your body. [M.I.] Act out a play or puppet show with your friends. [Ie.I.] Plug your nose and try different foods. How do they taste? Unplug your nose and taste the same food. Does this change their taste? Taste the food with your eyes closed. Does this affect their taste? Play different sports. How do you use your body differently in each sport? Do you prefer some sports to others? Why? [Ia.I.] Pretend you are a machine and use your body to accomplish a task. Are some body parts more useful than others? Why is that? [Ia.I.] Play charades. [Ie.I.] Measure different things with your various body parts. Compare the lengths of different items in your house. [LM.I.] LEVEL 3 Try writing with your toes or with your eyes closed. What are some of the challenges you face? [Ia.I.] Design a machine or a structure and then give a friend detailed instructions as to how to build the same machine or structure. Did they succeed? Why or why not? [Ie.I][LM.I.] Create a dance using ten different dance steps. Teach the dance to someone else. [Ie.I.] Learn about your body and how it functions. How does your body work in harmony to help you do the things you do? What can you do to keep your body healthy? [LM.I.] * (image courtesy of Ed Schipul) Want to see more activities to help develop multiple intelligences? Try these. About the Author: Karla Valenti is a writer, blogger, founder and CEO of NiSoSa, and Creative Director for Rock Thoughts. Get more on Facebook, Twitter, G+,...

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Using Bodily Intelligence to Teach Literacy

Posted by on Aug 18, 2011 in Blog, Bodily, Ideas in practice, Linguistic, Multiple Intelligences | 0 comments

Over the summer I have been working with the Diva on learning the letters of the alphabet. The way letters are typically taught is primarily through visual intelligence and musical intelligence; that is, children are taught to make associations between the way letters look and how they sound. However, bodily intelligence is equally important to this learning process and in fact, can greatly help facilitate early literacy. Here’s how this works: Connecting Sounds to Images When we pronounce a letter, we are making a sound that results from a specific and distinct act that we perform with our body. Stringing many of these sounds together, creates words and sentences. Children who are learning how to read, start by isolating the individual sounds that each letter makes from within a group of letters (i.e. a word) and pegging them to the image of a specific letter. The challenge, however, is that what we deem as an isolated sound is not necessarily intuitive just by listening. For instance, take the word elephant. When I asked the Diva to identify the first sound she heard, she said “el.” “El” is actually made up of two sounds – the e and the l sounds but to her, that combination is the first sound she hears. Therefore, in order for her to be able to separate the e and the l sounds, we focused on how they felt. Creating Sounds is a Physical Experience What makes one letter sound different from another, is the way we form it, the specific position of our mouth, tongue, teeth, lips, and throat. Therefore, to learn a letter, we must also learn to connect it with the physical experience of forming it. To return to our elephant: to say the letter E, we need to stretch our mouth and say the sound at the back of our throat. To say the letter, L we need to touch the tip of our tongue to the back of our front teeth. I had the Diva say the sound “el” again and we talked about the different motions that her body performed to make each letter. She realized that the sound “el” entailed two separate motions and that realization allowed her to separate the first sound one from the second sound. Once we isolated each sound, we then focused on forming them in different words. This helped reinforce the physical experience of forming those letters. After that, we were able to work on isolating the sounds those letters make from words she heard and finally, connecting those sounds to the images of the letters they represented. As always, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Also, if you like this post, please share it! __________________________ DID YOU KNOW: this is an excellent way to empower children and to develop their multiple intelligences (especially their linguistic and bodily-kinesthetic intelligence). About the Author: Karla Valenti blogs about parenting on Tot Thoughts, is founder and CEO of NiSoSa (developing resources to empower children through creativity), Creative Director for Rock Thoughts (a global art and collaborative storytelling initiative), and does creative writing as herself and as Nico, a fictional character and host of Nico Knows (creative writing for kids). © Tot Thoughts – smart parenting for smart child...

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